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Role of maternal inflammation on the genesis of autism



The television show “Découverte” recently aired a story about a research project on the role of maternal inflammation on the genesis of autism, showcasing the work of Dr. Guillaume Sébire from the RI-MUHC and Université de Sherbrooke Professor Maxime Descoteaux. Click here to listen to the news report!

Role of maternal inflammation on the genesis of autism

Role of maternal inflammation on the genesis of autism

Project director: Dr. Guillaume Sébire, MUHC / Collaborators: Prof. Maxime Descoteaux, CHU de Sherbrooke and Marie-Julie Allard, Ph.D. student at the MUHC

The medical community long thought that reduced oxygen to the brain at birth was the main reason why some premature babies had developmental delays. However, this belief is but a preconceived notion, with the real culprits being inflammatory cells.

Marie-Julie Allard, a Ph.D. student at the MUCH who is working on this research project, used a preclinical animal model to illustrate how a placenta infection triggered by certain strep B subtypes impacted the genesis of disorders along the autism spectre in males, but not in females. The next step in this research will involve blocking the inflammatory buffer in question while also administering antibiotics, in an attempt to protect the growing brain from inflammatory attacks provoked by an infected placenta.

Dr. Guillaume Sébire, a research scientist at the RI-MUHC, has dedicated 20 years to exploring this hypothesis. Radio-Canada’s television program “Découverte” aired an excellent segment on this research project concerning autism and other inflammatory neurological neonatal diseases supported by the Foundation of Stars.