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Cardiac imaging at the heart of the practice

Cardiac imaging is actually at the heart of present-day pediatric cardiology, be it to diagnose congenital defects in the heart’s structure, to obtain detailed views of a child’s heart, or to monitor changes to various cardiac problems in infants.

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The Foundation of Stars has the privilege of working with researchers from all fields of expertise. In the coming months, we will share with you research projects on different axes of pediatric research. Thus you will discover a multitude of well-popularized scientific advances.

To celebrate February, which is Heart Month, we’ll be unveiling information on pediatric cardiology research and some of the most promising and exciting projects currently underway.

Cardiac imaging is actually at the heart of present-day pediatric cardiology, be it to diagnose congenital defects in the heart’s structure, to obtain detailed views of a child’s heart, or to monitor changes to various cardiac problems in infants. It wasn’t so long ago that clinical experts had to resort to much more invasive - and riskier! - methods to perform these same tasks. In the 1970s and 1980s, researchers made great strides when they developed the MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and the CAT (computerized axial tomography) scan. This was the first foray into the world of non-invasive diagnoses. How did we manage to develop a procedure as efficient and important, in terms of scientific advancement? First and foremost, the development was fueled by a fervent desire to improve the lives of children, closely followed by the hopes of helping generous donors with an understanding of the positive impacts of cardiac imaging on treatment.

As we know, science never rests. Ongoing improvements in non-invasive imaging techniques have resulted in a never-before-seen degree of understanding of the cardiac function and morphology.

Interview with Wadi Mawad.